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Frequently Asked Questions

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Yes. Anytime you have sex, there is a chance you can get an STI. However, it is a lot less likely when you use condoms correctly every time you have sex. Latex condoms are highly effective in reducing the risk of getting an STI, including HIV. Other condoms, such as lamb skin condoms, can prevent some STIs, but do not protect against HIV.

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Yes. You can get an STI while taking the birth control pill because it uses hormones to prevent pregnancy. Those hormones do not protect against STIs.

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A STI is passed from one person to another when having oral, vaginal or anal sex. Examples of STIs are chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B, and trichomonasis (commonly called Trich).

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Yes. It is possible you to get pregnant if you have sex while you have your menstrual period (bleeding).

Ovulation is the release of an egg from the ovaries into the uterus and is the most fertile time for a female. Vaginal bleeding during ovulation is common and can be mistaken for a period. After ejaculation, sperm can survive for a few days inside the vagina or uterus even if there is bleeding. If ovulation occurs while sperm is still alive, pregnancy can occur.

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No. You should never use two condoms at the same time. Using two condoms at one time may cause both condoms to come off, which would release the sperm. Practice the rule: one condom for each sex act performed

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Yes. The only way to have no risk of a pregnancy is to not have sex (abstinence). If you decide to have sex, using birth control will reduce the risk of becoming pregnant.

Birth control only works if you use it correctly every time you have sex. Some birth control prevents pregnancy better than others and only condoms reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

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The best way to avoid a pregnancy is to not have sex (abstinence). This is 100% effective in preventing pregnancy.

If you decide to have sex or are already sexually active, then you need to use protection, also known as birth control (contraception). Birth control has to be used correctly every time you have sex for it to work

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Certain antibiotics can stop the pill from working properly. This can increase your chance of getting pregnant.

Use a back up method, like condoms (male or female), or do not have vaginal sex, while taking the antibiotic and a week after finishing the antibiotics.

Remember, if you are given a prescription for an antibiotic; it is very important to tell the clinician that you are on the pill.

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There is no change in fertility with the use of birth control pills. However, if your periods were irregular before you started taking the Pill, it's likely that your periods will be irregular again when you stop taking it.

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No. The Pill actually protects against cancer of the ovaries and cancer of the lining of the uterus. A woman is half as likely to get cancer of the uterus or ovaries if she takes the Pill. Most experts believe that taking oral contraceptive pills does not cause an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Even girls with a family history of breast cancer can take the Pill.

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There is no medical reason that you need to take a “break” from the pill.

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You can continue to take birth control pills as long as you are healthy and wish to avoid unwanted pregnancy. Well, pills are also used for other treatments like curing irregular menstrual cycles, acne control, control premenstrual syndrome etc. In fact, continue use of contraceptives will protect from various cancers like ovarian cysts, endometrial and breast cysts or lumps

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Yes. You can get pregnant the first time you have sex. It doesn’t matter how many times you have sex, there is always a chance of getting pregnant. Not having sex is the only guaranteed way to prevent pregnancy. The best way to avoid pregnancy is to not have sex or only have sex after you have a birth control method started.

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The morning-after pill, also known as emergency contraception, is used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or when there is a problem with birth control, such as a broken condom. It may be taken up to 120 hours after sex, but it is most effective within 72 hours of sex.

The morning-after pill contains high levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone. The hormones work in a number of ways to prevent pregnancy: they may delay ovulation (the release of an egg during a female’s monthly cycle), affect the development of the uterine lining, and prevent the fertilization process.

This is not an abortion pill, so it will not work if you are already pregnant. If you are 17 years or older you or your partner can buy the morning-after pill at a pharmacy without a prescription. The morning-after pill is also available at family planning clinics.

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Yes, teenagers can get birth control without parents' permission. Birth control and other reproductive health services at federally funded Title X family planning clinics in the United States are strictly confidential, which means that clinic staff cannot share any patient's information with anyone unless you give the clinic staff permission.

Even though federally funded family planning clinics offer confidential services to teenagers, it's always a good idea for teens to talk with their parents or another trusted adult to help them carefully consider their decision about becoming sexually active and the need to use birth control in preventing pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases (STD).

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